War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 1050 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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HEADQUARTERS,

Richmond, May 7, 1863.

Major General D. H. HILL,

Commanding, &c., Goldsborough:

GENERAL: We have reports from different sources that the plans of the enemy are to concentrate Hunter's and Foster's armies for a general attack upon Richmond. Make all needful arrangements to prevent such a contingency.

Your force will, of course, be obliged to come up here; so with the chief force at Charleston. If you find movements in progress you will so shape your own to meet them without awaiting further orders from these headquarters.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Richmond, Va., May 7, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

SIR: His Excellency the President expressed the desire last night that i should join General Lee at Fredericksburg at once.

I regard the opening and securing the communication of General Lee's army with this city of the first importance, and fear that this may not be accomplished if I leave it unfinished. There are some indications, too, that the enemy may bring one or two other columns against this city, with the hope of getting possession by a sudden dash. I think more important that these things should be considered and that we should have our forces so in hand as to meet any such contingency. I propose, therefore, to remain here until I can so arrange and dispose of my forces as to free General Lee's army of the force which now threatens his communications.

I remain, sir, with great respect, your most obedient servant,

JAMES LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General.

GOLDSBOROUGH, N. C., May 7, [1863]-10 a. m.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War, C. S. A.:

Inclosed are the last reports* from scouts. Foster has sent out of New Berne and Washington the citizens who have hitherto furnished information. I think that these papers clearly establish, that the Charleston expedition is abandoned, and that the few troops leaving New Berne are more than replaced by others. I have believed ever since the failure at Charleston that Foster would demand and get back the twenty regiments furnished to Hunter.

General Daniel has gone down with two brigade (his own and ransom's) to feel the enemy about Core Creek. If they fall back without show of fight it is clear that Foster is not strong there and that he is massed upon the railroad between New Berne and Morehead, fearing that the Confederate will cut it. Unfortunately this is a difficult task. There are but three approaches to it through the swamps and these are fortified. I have but three brigades outside of Wilmington (Daniel,

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* Not found.

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