War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 1030 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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KINSTON, N. C., April 29, 1863.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD, Charleston, S. C.,

GENERAL: I see it stated in the New York papers that Hunter had but 7,000 men who could be spared to co-operate with Du Point. How true this is I do not know, but all the papers concur in the statement the land force was small. I have force enough here, of concentrated, to fight Foster successfully, but the troops are necessary scattered over near 10 miles. With the Neuse, Tar Roanoke, and Chowan running nearly up to the railroad, it is an easy matter for the Yankees to make raised into the richest agricultural portion of North Carolina of the South and carry off hundreds of negroes and destroy an incalculable amount of property., It is impossible to protect the farmers' interests if this fertile region without a division of force and consequent weakness. I learn from General Whiting that Even's brigade has gone back to Charleston, and the object of this is to ask if you could send me Clingman's brigade., If the attack should be renewed at Charleston I could return it rapidly, as I would encamp it on the railroad at Magnolia Depot. General Longstreet has got all my cavalry worth a sou, and a sudden cavalry raid on the railroad, might be successful in destroying the bridges and trestle-works below Magnolia.

With great respect,

D. H. HILL,

Major-General.

KINSTON, N. C., April 29, 1863.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD, Charleston, S. C.:

GENERAL: I send you report of a trustworthy scout. I am satisfied that Foster has applied for and is getting back the twenty regiments furnished to Hunter. This will give him a force more than doubt double of mine, and troops, too, which have seen more service. The Yankees have shown unusual boldness lately, and this with them always indicates that presence of a large force. Yesterday my outposts were pushed back to within 5 miles of this place and they are near me in heavy force. I cannot bring my three brigades to this point lest a sudden movement be made from Washington on Greenville and Tarborough. I am very desirous to get Clingman's brigade at Wilmington, that Cooke might be on the railroad. Clingman's troops have been much demoralized, and I learn can only be trusted behind earthworks. I have no idea that the Yankees under Hunter will make a land advance. Foster, however, is bold, but ambitious and fanatical. I have obtained a copy of a letter from him Dix last winter (December), in which he proposes to destroy the railroad at Kinston and march upon Wilmington. The defeat of Burnside arrest that pretty little plan. I hope that you can send me Clingman's brigade.

With great respect,

D. H. HILL,

Major-General.

[Inclosure.]

SWANSBOROUGH, N. C., April 27, 1863.

Major JAMES H. HILL:

MAJOR: The highest estimate that any one in whom I can rely has made of the number of troops sent up to New Berne is 5,000. Of the number of vessels I have been unable to learn anything further than has been already dispatched you. Through a scout of General Ransom's I