War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 1013 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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CHARLESTON, S. C., April 22, 1863.

Brigadier General W. S. WALKER, Pocotaligo, S. C.:

Cooke's brigade must return to Wilmington soon as possible. Regiment will be sent you from Savannah. Use transportation to send on Cooke's troops. Answer.

THOMAS JORDAN,

Chief of Staff.

CHARLESTON, S. C., April 22, 1863.

JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

Have already ordered Cooke' brigade to report to General Whiting; Evans to remain in North Carolina until further orders. I will hold Clingman's ready to move so soon as I can ascertain what enemy's forces intend doing here.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

ADAMS' BRIDGE, April 22, 1863-6.30 a. m.

Major-General HILL:

GENERAL: Your special courier has just arrived with your dispatch of 9.30 p. m., 21st instant.

I have already sent a dispatch to you at Kinston announcing that I am going to Hookerton,there to await orders. But I shall now proceed from that point to Kinston by the direct road, whatever that may be.

I have forwarded your previous to me to General Daniel, so I suppose he knows what to do. I have given him no instructions from myself.

Yours, very truly,

J. J. PETTIGREW,

Brigadier-General.

Your know I am ignorant of the topography around Kinston. Please have a guide and a map for me if I am to go into position.

GUM SWAMP, N. C., April 22, 1863.

[Major General D. H. HILL:]

GENERAL: Captain [B.] Mane has just returned from the reconnaissance on which he went early this morning. He went to within half a mile of Core Creek and sent a lieutenant ([M.] Lee) and 3 men over the creek, who went half a mile beyond the creek, to the late encampment of the enemy. It appears like the encampment of a brigade. They left this morning before day. An old family near place say there was 4,000 or 5,000. Nothing has been done lately to the railroad bridge, but it can easily be prepared for use, being only about 25 feet long. The track was destroyed by being overturned, the sills adhering to the rails, and you will at once see that it can be rendered fit for use by simply turning the superstructure back to its original position, which can be done rapidly when sufficient force can be brought to bear. The enemy have righted up the track for about 3 miles this side of the creek. The track has been upturned in the manner described from a point