War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 1002 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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HEADQUARTERS, April 19, 1863.

Major General S. G. FRENCH, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: General Hood had moved a brigade down to where the battery was. It will be better not to move any more troops in the darkness.

Most respectfully,

JAMES LONGSTREET.

Try and ascertain as soon as possible the circumstances and why the North Carolina regiment was not at the support of the battery. Your note is received. I think that you had better hurry down. Robertson's brigade is on the way via Norfleet's house. General Hood can advise you of the route it took.

HEADQUARTERS, April 19, 1863.

Major General S. G. FRENCH, Commanding, &c.:

GENERAL: General Hood writes me that General Law sends him word that the enemy landed below the battery and charged it. I fear that our infantry has not been doing its duty properly. Please ascertain the facts in the case and apply the remedy. It it is true that the enemy is on this side he should be driven into the river. General Hood has ordered General Robertson's brigade down. if you need it you had better send Davis' brigade also and have the infantry so placed in future as to guard against any such contingency. I am fearful that some such attempt may be made at the other ba made at the other batteries.

Most respectfully,

JAMES LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS,

Nearer Suffolk, Va., April 19, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON, Secretary of War:

SIR: From present appearances we shall be occupied some two weeks longer in drawing off the supplies from the counties east of the Chowan. If the Richmond would pass the obstruction she would be of great service by being in position to threaten any more that the enemy might be inclined to made toward my rear. If the enemy knew that she was outside f the obstructions he would not venture within her reach. I do not desire that she should move down the river at all. i am somewhat apprehensive that if we should prove to be very troublesome here the enemy may move a considerable force from the army of the Potomac in behind me. I have no great dread of any force that may come in my front, but a move on my flank may compel me to retire. I believe that we are doing very well in drawing in supplies, but some difficulty exists in consequence of having too many purchasers in the field. The citizens at first agreed that 50 cents was enough for their bacon, but some agents of the Commissary-General have come over and are, I understand, giving $1. So we are obliged now to pay 75 cents, and I suppose that it will advance to pay 75 cents, and I suppose that it will advance to $1 in a few days.

I remain, sir, with great respect, your most obedient servant,

JAMES LONGSTREET,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

P. S.-The enemy's troops from the counties south of this are reported to have fled to Roanoke Island.