War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0992 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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run some distance above Greenville to get wood, and will not be able to return until late to-morrow morning to Boyd's Ferry, I should judge. I am in great perplexity how to manage to get over before some time in the day to-morrow. I thought it would not be safe to leave the bridge until I heard from you after Colonel Ferebee's report of an advance of the enemy. Subsequent reports do not confirm an advance, though it is likely they will do so if they are re-enforced at Washington. Please let me hear from you as soon as possible.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. B. GARNETT,

Brigadier-General.

APRIL 16, 1863-9.30.

[Major General D. H. HILL:]

GENERAL: I have received your dispatch of this morning and will take the steps you desire. My men are very much worn out by constant picketing, and the wet and the somewhat long march of last night. It took my command until daylight to make it. I have a quantity of commissary stores and some corn. I will send these up by boat to Greenville provided your orders do no conflict with this arrangement. The boat can take them up and return to-night or early to-morrow. Should there be any delay in removing my stores I will direct Colonel Ferebee to protect them.

Very respectfully,

R. B. GARNETT,

Brigadier-General.

TRANTER'S CREEK BRIDGE,

April 16, 1863-8.30 p. m.

[Major General D. H. HILL:]

GENERAL: I have received your dispatch by Lieutenant Reid; also yours of 5.30 p. m. I shall withdraw to-morrow morning at daylight. I have directed Colonel Ferebee to remain here, and to take up the bridges at this point and at Gaines. I shall get off all my stores, except a quantity of corn that I am having ground at Pactolus. I think Colonel F. can hold the enemy long enough in check to have it ground and sent to Greenville. I sent Captain Reilly off this morning to Tarborough, according to your orders. Captain Bunting is still here, but I do not apprehend I shall require his services. I can get along better without the boat. The road to Boyd's Ferry is impassable for wagons, and even couriers have a very hard time at night.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. B. GARNETT,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

TRANTER'S CREEK BRIDGE,

April 16, 1863-12.10 p. m.

[Major General D. H. HILL:]

GENERAL: Colonel Ferebee has retired with his brigade to this point. He reports that he left his position near Washington between 8 and 9 o'clock this morning; also that their cavalry and a body of infantry followed them some distance. The information is indefinite, but the