War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0988 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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in he North of which we know nothing. I therefore hope you will be able to press Foster hard. He is not the man, nor Wessells either, to fight you and me both at once.

Very truly,

W. H. C. WHITING,

Brigadier-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPT. VIRGINIA AND N. CAROLINA, No.-.

Near Suffolk, Va., April 14, 1863.

Major General S. G. French is temporarily assigned to the command of all the artillery serving with the forces on the Blackwater. It will be under his control and direction, and commanding officers will accord due observance of his orders and dispositions.

By command of Lieutenant-General Longstreet:

G. MOXLEY SORREL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE CAPE FEAR,

Wilmington, N. C., April 15, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: I beg leave, in the short lull afforded by the enemy, to urge my need of more heavy guns, especially the 8 or 10-inch columbiads and the Brooke rifle. The enemy, I think, now will either renew a desperate effort on Charleston, or, fearful of that place, try one they suppose to be weaker. If injury to us be an object they ought scarcely to attempt this place. You are aware of the inadequacy of our armament here, and that many guns intended for Wilmington have been diverted to meet what have been required as more pressing necessities elsewhere. I am much in want now of at least two heavy rifles and four columbiads (8 or 10-inch), with their ammunition.

Very respectfully,

W. H. C. WHITING,

Brigadier-General.

APRIL 15, 1863-9.30 a. m.

[Major General D. H. HILL:]

GENERAL: My train has just arrived from the Pungo River. It brings up 65 barrels of corn and about 8,000 pounds of bacon. Of this lot 2,000 pounds came from Hyde. Captain Swindell, who sent agents into Hyde, reports that most of the bacon remaining in that country is in the hands of persons who have taken the oath of allegiance, and they will not sell it unless it is impressed. I have ordered my train to go to Tranter's Creek Bridge. You do not say in your last dispatch how the surplus meat at Tranter's Bridge is to be transported. I suggested that it should be sent to Greenville or Tarborough by steamboat from Boyd's Landing. Please let me have definite instructions in this matter, as I do not think my train can haul the meat in question should we have to move the wagon train all at once. I have no control over the steam-boat, and have therefore reported the above facts to you in order that you might give the necessary directions should you deem this mode of transportation preferable. I judge from the spirited reply the enemy