War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0878 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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the event of a landing in force on either. I cannot believe that a serious blow at this city is contemplated at this season, and if the approach is to be from the York River I am satisfied it will not be ventured. Still, it is well to be guarded fully and in time, and the President thinks if you do not apprehend immediate attack, which, with the present state of the roads he does not think practicable, that you had better move what you may deem an adequate force to protect this city in supporting distance, say at Hanover Junction. We have not, I fear, more than some 3,000 effective troops here and at Drewry's Bluff. On the receipt of General French's dispatch General Davis, with his brigade, was ordered to the Blackwater to re-enforce General Pryor. The intelligence of an expected attack on Charleston, and the removal of nearly all the troops, together with General Foster and his staff, south from North Carolina, induced the President likewise to order a brigade (Clingman's) from Wilmington to Charleston, and another from General Daniel's division to replace it, and be held prepared to move forward likewise to Charleston if events required, to be itself replaced by a further brigade from General [Junius] Daniel's division. the other forces in North Carolina have been for the present ordered to be disposed by General French as he deems best for the protection of Weldon, Goldsborough, and the line of the railroad. Not having the key to your cipher, and a mistake having been committed by the telegraph operator in the first two words in cipher, I have been much puzzled to make out your telegram received this morning; and though I had the aid of Major [William] Norris, of the Signal Corps, it was not until after my telegram this evening was sent that, by trying other words, I succeeded in deciphering it. The march of Pickett's division to Richmond may, very probably, suffice at present to guard against any sudden attack on this city. I will keep you advised of any further intelligence received. General Pryor promised, by telegram of the 14th instant, to give by to-night certain intelligence, both in relation to the reported forces on the James and the re-enforcements at Suffolk. As yet intelligence has not come.

With high esteem, very truly, yours,

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, Va., February 15, 1863.

Major General GUSTAVUS W. SMITH,

Commanding, &c.:

SIR: After consultation with the President I desire that you will order Brigadier-General Davis, with his brigade, to re-enforce General Pryor, on the Blackwater, and Clingman's brigade from Wilmington to Charleston; that you will send a brigade of Daniel's division at once to Wilmington to replace Clingman's and hold another ready to move in the same direction, so that in case events require it likewise may be forwarded to Charleston and be itself replaced at Wilmington - perhaps afterwards followed to Charleston by another brigade of Daniel's division. The residue of his force General French will dispose as he deems most judicious for the defense of Weldon, Goldsborough, and the line of the railroads.

With high esteem, very truly, yours,

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.