War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0850 NORTH CAROLINA AND S E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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JANUARY 15, 1863.

General BEAUREGARD;

G. W. [Smith] says the real attack is probably on Wilmington, with their whole force. He inquires how he can best aid me, whether by re-enforcing or falling on his reserve. The best way is the speediest junction. Asks how many men I have and whether I can withdrawn if iron-clads pass the forts. I shall not withdraw except by order. If 50,000 men are thrown on Wilmington you must stir up troops in the north. They ought to have hurried before this, unless they expect impossibilities.

W. H. C. WHITING.

CHARLESTON, S. C., January 15, 1863.

Brigadier General W. H. C. WHITING,

Wilmington, N. C.:

Good plan attacking monitor is to board in small boats at night, throwing bottles burning fluid in tower and bags powder in funnel of chimney.

G. T. BEAUREGARD.

HEADQUARTERS,

Wilmington, N. C., January 16, 1863.

Colonel JOHN A. BAKER,

Commanding Forty-first [N. C. T. or Third] Cavalry:

COLONEL: Impede the enemy's advance by every device within your means; destroy all bridges in his route, however trifling. Keep on the alert, and as he draws nearer to our lines dispatch frequent couriers. Accustom your men to skirmish with his advance, to ambuscade, &c.

Very respectfully,

W. H. C. WHITING,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS,

Wilmington, N. C., January 16, 1863.

General GUSTAVUS W. SMITH,

Commanding, Goldsborough:

Scouts report just received. Still no enemy this side of Trent yesterday or night before last, but very large force on opposite bank, making toward Kinston. Citizens report two regiments of Indians with them.

W. H. C. WHITING.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.

Richmond, Va., January 16, 1863.

General GUSTAVUS W. SMITH,

Goldsborough, N. C.:

General Lee has placed Ransom's division at your control. I telegraphed you to that effect two days ago.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.