War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0844 NORTH CAROLINA AND S E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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this office know the point. With a firm reliance on Divine Providence, I bid you and your brave garrison Godspeed. Fight as well as you have labored and I have no fears for the result.

Very respectfully,

W. H. C. WHITING,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, January 13, 1863.

General R. E. LEE, Fredericksburg, Va.:

Without fully crediting I send the following dispatch from General G. W. Smith for your information:

GOLDSBOROUGH, January 12, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON:

I have just received from General Whiting the following dispatch, dated to-day; "Have received further information from Lieutenant Fairly, confirmatory of that sent to-day." Adds that General Dix, at Shepherdsville Friday last, reports that many of the enemy are from Burnside's army; reports the enemy at New Berne from 50,000 to 70,000 men; 15,000 at Morehead City, with forty-two steamers, and that they move on Kinston by Dover road; that they intend landing a force on the Sound and attacking the force here at the same time, and all the movements will commence on Wednesday.

G. W. SMITH,

Major-General.

The following dispatch just received from General Smith:

GOLDSBOROUGH, January 12, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON:

General Beauregard telegraphs that he has reliable information from New York that General Naglee's land force was but 12,000 strong.

G. W. SMITH,

Major-General.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS

Wilmington, N. C., January 13, 1863

Colonel JOHN A. BAKER,

Commanding Forty-first Regiment [N. C. T., or Third Cavalry]:

COLONEL: Unless General Robertson has given you special instructions as to your movements, you will, in case of a land advance of the enemy in this direction, send one company to fall back upon Colonel Harrison and with the remainder of your force watch their flank, moving, if forced back, across the Cape Fear (Northeast Branch) to afford as much protection as you can to the railroad and telegraph. If they land below the mouth of New River watch their rear and follow them up.

Very respectfully,

W. H. C. WHITING,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.