War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0812 NORTH CAROLINA AND S E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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Weldon, and the Blackwater. You will move with the rest of your troops as soon as possible to Goldsborough and take command there until my arrival.

G. W. SMITH,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.

Richmond, Va., January 2, 1863.

General G. T. BEAUREGARD, Charleston, S. C.:

Further more reliable intelligence indicates very strongly the purpose of the enemy to move with force (supposed to be 30,000 men) in North Carolina, probably on Wilmington, landing at New Berne or Morehead City, marching to Swansborough; thence along the coast. Aid as soon and as far as you can with safety.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, Va., January 2, 1863.

General R. E. LEE, Fredericksburg, Va.:

Information of fleet in the Roads derived from two different gentlemen residing on the bay, represented (but not known to me) as reliable. Information of expected movement in North Carolina and probable intent to advance on Wilmington from private sources at New Berne vouched by past experience to be trustworthy. I have telegraphed General Beauregard requesting aid, as far as safe to himself, for Wilmington. He had withdrawn his late re-enforcement. General Smith nearly strips Richmond, leaving only about 2,500 men.

J. A. SEDDON.

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, Va., January 2, 1863

General R. E. LEE, Fredericksburg, Va.:

Reliable information satisfies me there has been in the bay a large fleet. Their movements are puzzling. They brought some troops to Gloucester Point and Yorktown, probably new levies, and carried off others. The fleet, containing at the least 7,000 or 8,000 men, sailed up the bay at least as New Point. Whether this was a ruse and they returned and passed the capes at night I cannot learn. I think it probable, for from all items of intelligence I conjecture an expedition meditated on North Carolina. General Bragg's victory more complete and its fruits greater than at first supposed. The enemy in retreat, with our cavalry in his rear.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

FREDERICKSBURG, VA., January 2, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

Your dispatches of 1st and 2nd just received. Is the information of