War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0753 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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30. Experience thus [far] has confirmed the views then taken, and it has been found that to place the enrollment of conscripts under the control of the general commanding a department, subjects it to change with every change of a department commander. General Lee's orders were not intended to conflict with the policy and express order of the department, but merely to secure the valuable aid of the adjutant-general of the State in carrying that policy out. The only objection to the order proposed by General Martin is the it conflicts with the conscript act in restricting the maximum of infantry companies to a smaller number than is allowed by that act. The right to volunteer before enrollment is reserved by law, and the order to Major Mallett only applies to enrolled men. Orders have been given for the immediate filling up of the Virginia and North Carolina regiments at Richmond, because the enemy are preparing to attack the city with a heavy force.

G. W. RANDOLPH.

[Inclosure.]

GENERAL ORDERS, STATE OF N. C., EXECUTIVE DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE (MILITIA), Numbers 7.

Raleigh, N. C., September 13, 1862.

I. Colonels and other officers in command of the Militia of North Carolina are hereby ordered to bring all men liable to conscription in their commands and all soldiers absent from their regiments without leave to the camp of instruction at Raleigh. All power necessary for the enforcing of this order is hereby given them.

II. A failure or refusal to comply with this order will subject the offender to the penalties of a court-martial and consequent reduction to the ranks.

III. The executive, through its own officers, having thus undertaken to collect all persons liable to militia duty instead of allowing Confederate officers to do so, it is earnestly hoped that all will come up promptly to the performance of their duty.

By order of Governor Vance:

J. G. MARTIN,

Adjutant-General.

A proclamation by Z. B. Vance, Governor of North Carolina.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

September 18, 1862.

Whereas information has reached me that certain persons, unmindful of the calls of patriotism and forgetful of the duties of good citizens, are using their influence to prevent obedience to the law of Congress unknown as the conscription law, and that others are attempting to organize an open resistance to its execution; and whereas such conduct being not only in direct violation of law, but also detrimental in the highest degree to the cause of our country, it becomes my sacred duty to prevent and repress same by all the means in my power:

Now, therefore, I, Zebulon B. Vance, Governor of North Carolina, do issue this my proclamation warning all such persons to desist from such unpatriotic and criminal conduct, earnestly hoping that all w ho are disinclined to defend their homes themselves, either by reason of age,infirmity, or cowardice, will cease to dissuade those who are willing, and notifying positively all persons contemplating an armed resistance to the law, if there really be any such misguided and evil-disposed persons in

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