War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0726 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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FORT MONROE, VA., May 22, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Eighty contrabands were sent last week to Franklin from Richmond to take up the iron on the Weldon road. Four of them are in Suffolk. We have now all the iron safe. We have commenced on the Petersburg road, near Zuni, and shall take up the track back to Windsor by to-night. We commenced dismantling these roads at the right time.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, May 22, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

Will be at Windsor before night on the return. I have 10,000 there to protect workmen. General Dodge is just from Windsor. He says 45-pound rail is just as good as the heavy one, and the Government can save much.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, May 23, 1863.

Major-General PECK:

I incline to the belief that there are few troops on the Blackwater. From two sources I learn that troops in large numbers have gone from New Haven to New York and to the Southwest by Danville. We have no artillerists. You must take them from your cavalry regiments.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., May 23, 1863-8.45 p. m.

General DIX:

General Dodge at Antioch Church was attacked at 6.15 p. m. No particulars.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

RED HOUSE, PICKET STATION, May 23, 1863.

Colonel J. RICHTER JONES,

Commanding Outposts:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that in accordance with your orders to me of the 21st instant I moved my company, together with Company L of my regiment and two companies of the One hundred and fifty-eighth New York Regiment from Captain

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command, on the Trent road, at 5 o'clock yesterday morning. On arriving at the Trenton Forks, which point was reached without our seeing more of the enemy than a half dozen who scattered into the woods at our approach, I sent one of the infantry companies down the Trenton road to reconnoiter the crossing of the river, and left the other at the forks. I proceeded with the cavalry up the Kinston road, and on reaching the edge of Noble's plantation, 6 miles from the forks, found it barricaded, and a small earthwork thrown up to the right of the road. Passing this ob-