War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0722 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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tions, is progressing favorably, but the frame for magazine has not been received, and preparations are now made to construct it on the ground.

This work, constructed by the Ninety-sixth New York Volunteers, I have named Fort Gray, in memory of Colonel C. O. Gray of that regiment, killed in battle at Kinston, subject to the approval of the commanding general. The obstructions at the head of the island have been commenced. There have been many difficulties on account of repairs to the pile-drivers and density of the substratum, but it is believed that work will progress hereafter more rapidly.

Light guns are required for Fort Williams and for the redoubt near the Columbia road.

At Roanoke Island working parties are employed in getting out palisades for Forts Reno and Parke. The north face of the latter is in danger of being seriously washed, as also the easterly face of Fort Foster, both of which require attention.

A few guerrillas are skulking within the limits of this county, but in small numbers, and a company of cavalry is reported to be in the neighborhood of Jamesville, but thus far have made no hostile demonstrations.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. WESSELLS,

Brigadier-General Volunteers, Commanding.

SUFFOLK, VA., May 18, 1863.

General DIX:

A contraband from Franklin says General Jenkins states that we are fortifying at Carrsville and relaying the road from this end with the rail from that end with the view of advancing. The mail-boats are at or below Franklin. Stratton reports Lieutenant Titus with 47 men having a skirmish near Newby's Bridge with 150 guerrillas. An ambuscade was prepared to capture all his party, but he cut his way through; Lieutenant Beatty and 2 privates severely and 1 sergeant slightly wounded; 1 rebel killed, 2 prisoners, several wounded. No loss of horses, some having been taken by us. Stratton approves the conduct of Lieutenant Titus.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., May 18, 1863.

General VIELE:

The boats were taken down to the Albemarle Sound and into the Chowan. They are at Franklin probably. Major Stratton sent out a party to the Pasquotank with a view of intercepting them.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, May 18, 1863.

Major-General PECK:

Do I understand that the railroad connection between Boston* and Baltimore* is now complete; and, if so, how many miles of iron this side the former are taken up and removed?

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

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*Cipher.

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