War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0717 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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under all circumstances that you should retain it, and I suggest whether now you may not repeat Colonel West's reconnaissance, pushing it farther on.

I am told there is only a small cavalry force at the White House. The expedition, if you think it advisable, from the information in your possession, to undertake it, should be organized under your personal superintendence.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

[FORT MONROE], May 14, 1863.

Major-General KEYES,

Commanding, Yorktown:

Your dispatch arrived this morning while I was away. I wrote you a few hours ago, stating that on full reflection I had decided to make West Point and independent command.

I have suggested a movement up the Peninsula. Please make the change you desire in the cavalry and I will endeavor to give it back to you in a few days with an addition of the same arm.

I have forwarded your letter to the Adjutant-General, as I have explained in mine, which you will receive to-morrow; but I cannot concur in your removal to another department.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA, SEVENTH ARMY CORPS,

Fort Monroe, Va., May 14, 1863.

Actg. Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE,

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron:

ADMIRAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 11th instant proposing that all the rebel earthworks within my lines, except such as are necessary for military purposes, should be razed.

All the troops at Suffolk have been constantly occupied since the retreat of the enemy in leveling his intrenchments, which are very extended and solid. When this is completed they will be occupied with not less urgent labors for the next month.

At Norfolk and Fort Monroe I have barely force enough for guard duty, but I will personally examine as soon as practicable all the earthworks in this vicinity and meet your wishes as far as I can. Elizabeth City is in North Carolina and not under my control.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., May 14, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

The matter of your letter of the 10th is approved. I write you to-day.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.