War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0701 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

FORT MONROE, VA.,

May 6, 1863-10 a. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I embarked 5,000 men yesterday and last night at Norfolk, and hope to have them at their destination to-morrow morning. We had a heavy blow last night, and it is yet too rough for some of our transports. I was at Suffolk yesterday. Over 200 prisoners had been brought in. They represented forty regiments, three batteries, two independent battalions, and one cavalry regiment. It is not at all probable that in these captures all the regiments before Suffolk were represented. The enemy's works, which are very extensive and heavy, indicate continued occupation. he was building stables. General Peck sends out a cavalry force to the Blackwater to-day.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, May 6, 1863.

Major-General PECK:

I have no news from Washington. This is not encouraging, as the wires were in operation last night. The enemy have doubtless left the Blackwater. Trains 3 miles long reached Petersburg last night.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, May 6, 1863-3.30 p. m.

Major-General DIX, Fort Monroe, Va.:

The operation agreed upon between us will not be made till further orders. Everything will remain as it is till you hear further from Washington.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

YORKTOWN, May 6, [1863].

Major-General DIX:

Colonel Davis, of the Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, with the advance of his regiment, has arrived at Gloucester Point, having accomplished fully the orders of General Stoneman. I have sent a cavalry scout up the Richmond road to get information of any of our cavalry which may be coming down. General Stoneman seems not to have been aware that the enemy have all along had troops on this Peninsular, and Colonel Davis encountered a regiment of infantry and three pieces at Tunstall Station. There is still a battery of eight pieces, by all accounts, at or near New Kent Court-House. Colonel Davis is very anxious to have a gunboat go up to the Mattapony to look for a detachment of his regiment under Major Bronson.

E. D. KEYES,

Major-General.