War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0685 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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28,000 to 30,000. One of the spies, who has spent weeks in their camps, supplied a list of that army, as well as Lee's, and 28,000 was the figure on April 1. He has enforced the conscription most vigorously in several counties, not heretofore visited, on this side of the Blackwater. He has been joined by 4,000 from Hill, and perhaps more; but the advance of Hooker will soon force him to the river. His men are ready to go at a moment's warning.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

(Copy to General Halleck.)

MAY 2, 1863.

General DIX:

The papers from the other line have the idea that Longstreet is up there and this was a foraging expedition. This correction proves that my limited sources of information have been better than General Hooker's for many weeks. General Longstreet has his own campaign and will not give it up until compelled to do so. The people at Washington should understand the nature of this siege of twenty-two days.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., May 2, 1863-8.50 p. m.

General DIX:

By a later dispatch from General Butterfield it is now understood that no troops have left my front. It is now reported to me that a train arrived at sunset and that troops were seen about the railway station.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

MAY 2, 1863.

General DIX:

Richmond Enquirer of 30th has a column on Hooker's advance and the adjunct by way of Suffolk. It thinks that "Longstreet has broken up the camp of negro-stealing Yankees, destroyed the command, and thereby inflicted a fatal blow to Hooker, involving a change of his plans."

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA, SEVENTH ARMY CORPS,

Fort Monroe, Va., May 2, 1863.

Actg. Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE,

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron:

ADMIRAL: Your letter of the 29th ultimo contains some references to affairs on the Nansemond which concern the immediate commander there more nearly than myself, and a copy will be forwarded to him.

I desire to acknowledge, as I always have, the readiness with which my calls on you for aid have been answered. In regard to differences of opinion between us concerning our respective duties I have done all