War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0671 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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GENERAL ORDERS, Numbers 68.

HDQRS, EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

New Berne, April 29, 1863.

The general commanding desires to express to the officers and men of the Third New York Volunteer Cavalry his appreciation of their gallant conduct and efficiency in the various actions and skirmishes in which they have been engaged with the enemy during their year's service in the Department of North Carolina.

The regiment will inscribe upon its standard and the several companies upon their guidons the names of battles and skirmishes as previously directed in orders.

The battle-flag of the Seventh Confederate (Claiborne) Cavalry, which was captured from the enemy in the gallant charge by a detachment of Companies A and E against superior numbers near Little Washington on the 18th day of April instant, is presented to the regiment as a distinguished mark of the favor and appreciation in which the gallant services of this command are held.

By command of Major-General Foster:

[SOUTHARD HOFFMAN,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

FORT MONROE, VA.,

April 30, 1863-3.30 p. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

The Ninth Regiment New York Volunteers is, I find, determined to leave on Sunday. It is one of the best regiments I have and I cannot afford to lose it at this moment. Can you give me another regiment in place of it? If not, can I have the company of heavy artillery at Fort McHenry belonging to Colonel Roberts' regiment here? I am told General Morris did not need it and thought of mounting it. With this and the two companies you have ordered from Fort Delaware I will try to manage, if you cannot give me another regiment.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, April 30, 1863,

Major-General DIX:

What does General Halleck say about the corps? One is due for my services, which have long been more arduous and responsible than most corps commanders.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, VA., April 30, 1863.

Major General JOSEPH HOOKER,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

We are invested at Suffolk by a superior force, but are getting stronger every day. I returned from there last evening. If the enemy attacks he will fare badly. A successful movement on your part, for which we are all most anxious, will be of great service to us by preventing Longstreet from being further re-enforced and may compel him to withdraw.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.