War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0667 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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greatly in need of the additional staff which such an organization would give, and no officer deserves more for his vigilance, discretion, and devotion to his duties.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, April 29, 1863.

Major-General PECK:

Captain Baylor has sent you seven guns and 200 rounds of ammunition for each. He has also sent four mortars and 1,000,000 cartridges for small-arms. His men are very much overworked, and will keep fast to-morrow.* The other five guns will be sent the next day.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 29, 1863.

Major-General HOOKER,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

I think I can hold Longstreet here for some time, which will favor your operations very materially. When he retires it will only be to his two railroads, where he can go to Lee or strike at me, according to circumstances. You and I will have plenty of work. He is bridging the Blackwater for railroad purposes. The impression is strong that Hill will leave North Carolina and join Longstreet.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

(Copy to General Halleck.)

APRIL 29, 1863.

Major-General PECK or DIX, Suffolk, Va.:

I have fully commenced my operations here. The result may be to draw from your front and afford you an opportunity to push or hold them.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

APRIL 29, 1863.

Major-General HOOKER,

Army of the Potomac:

No change of note here. Heavy rain. Governor Seward was here to-day.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA, SEVENTH ARMY CORPS,

Fort Monroe, April 29, 1863.

General J. G. FOSTER, New Berne, N. C.:

MY DEAR GENERAL: I have just returned from Suffolk. There is a constant interchange of shots from rifle-pits and occasionally from batteries. The enemy has about 40,000 men.

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*The day of national humiliation, fasting, and prayer enjoined by the President's proclamation of March 30, 1863.

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