War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0664 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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FORT MONROE, April 28, 1863.

Major-General PECK:

Captain Baylor already preparing the guns, and they will be sent as soon as possible. You will have twelve.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 28, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

A man who was at Franklin on the 20th says the railway bridge was being built; also that he saw two trains of troops coming from Weldon.

The people told him that 45,000 men were under Longstreet and more coming from Carolina.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE ARSENAL, VA., April 28, 1863.

Lieutenant A. B. JOHNSON, Suffolk, Va.:

I will send you to-morrow 1,000,000 cartridges, caliber 57, and the remainder soon after. I will forward the 24 and 12 pounder ammunition as soon as it can be prepared. I have telegraphed for the 18 pounder ammunition. Your requisitions are large. Have you storage for it?

T. G. BAYLOR,

First Lieutenant, Arsenal, Fort Monroe.

SUFFOLK, April 28, 1863.

Lieutenant T. G. BAYLOR,

Commanding Arsenal, Fortress Monroe, Va.:

I am aware that my requisitions are large, but not as large as the general suggested. He thinks we shall soon have use for it all.

My storage is not sufficient, but am assured that more shall be provided.

The amount of daily consumption of ammunition now is not small, although reports say "all quiet at Suffolk."

A. B. JOHNSON,

Lieutenant, Ordnance Officer.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA, SEVENTH ARMY CORPS,

Fort Monroe, Va., April 28, 1863.

General HENRY A. WISE,

Or Commanding Officer of the Troops on the Chickahominy:

SIR: The town of Williamsburg has been occupied, as you are aware, by the troops under my command as a picket station or outpost of Yorktown. A large portion of the inhabitants are known not to be well disposed to the Government of the United States. They have nevertheless been quietly pursuing their domestic avocations, been unmolested, and have been permitted to supply themselves with the necessaries and comforts of life at Yorktown and Fort Monroe. The instance asylum at Williamsburg has been put under the superintendence of an army surgeon, and its 300 helpless inmates supplied, at the expense of the United