War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0644 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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Our little gunboats, so much called for and relied on by army, are not a suitable defense for that stream, and their services are really necessary elsewhere.

I have the honor to be, general, yours, respectfully,

S. P. LEE,

Actg. Rear-Admiral, Commanding N. Atlantic Blockading Squadron.

[Indorsement.]

This was written last night and sent into the Nansemond under cover to Lieutenant Lamson this morning (21st) and forwarded to him. The battery was abandoned last night against the urgent remonstrances of Lieutenant Lamson.

L.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 21, 1863.

Major-General HOOKER,

Army of the Potomac:

General Halleck has just left my headquarters. General Longstreet is here, waiting Hill or other troops. I hold everything yet. How do you get along?

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

APRIL 21, 1863-10 p. m.

Major-General PECK,

Suffolk, Va.:

Am glad to hear good tidings from you. You must be patient with me. I must play with these devils before I can spring. Remember that my army is at the bottom of a well and the enemy holds the top.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS, Numbers 60.

New Berne, April 21, 1863.

The fort recently constructed at Plymouth, N. C., will be called Fort Williams, after Brigadier General Thomas Williams, killed in action at Baton Rouge, La., August 5, 1862, who was the first general officer commanding in this department.

By command of Major General J. G. Foster:

[SOUTHARD HOFFMAN,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 22, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

Everything is as yesterday. Since Hooker has not moved it will be requisite for the greatest caution here. There are reports that the rebels are sending troops north from Charleston. Stratton finds Longstreet's pickets on turnpike 10 miles this side of Sandy Cross and at