War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0638 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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occupied by their batteries on the rivers are all now in possession of our troops, who are able to hold them. There is now no difficulty in passing into Washington with men and supplies.

General Foster left here yesterday with a force to march across the country. General Foster informed you in a letter of the 16th instant that he had directed Plymouth, Elizabeth City, and Winfield to be evacuated. He countermanded that order, too late, however, for Winfield; that has been abandoned, but the troops remain at the other places.

At Plymouth they are well fortified. Winfield is of little importance, and I shall not reoccupy the place, but leave it for General Foster to decide when he returns.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

I. N. PALMER,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, EIGHTEENTH ARMY CORPS, New Berne, April 19, 1863.

Major General J. G. FOSTER,

Commanding Eighteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL; General Prince himself a few miles beyond Core Creek and carrying out your instructions.

I last night informed you of the arrival of the other regiments of General Heckman's brigade, and asking the disposition to be made of them. General Halleck writes, in reply to my letter or him informing him of the state of affairs, that no re-enforcements can be spared to come here, and that "if any accident should occur to General Foster you will bear in mind that operations in North Carolina should be strictly defensive, and the troops concentrated as much as possible. New Berne and Beaufort are the points of most importance."

Farquhar is here from Plymouth. He will wait here for a day or two to see you. Winfield was abandoned before the order countermanding arrived. I saw to-day a large steamer with supplies for Plymouth. The Phoenix goes also with stores to Washington. I have written to General Halleck a history of affairs that have transpired since you wrote your last letter to him.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

I. N. PALMER,

Brigadier-General.

NEAR CORE CREEK, N. C., April 19, 1863-10.24 a. m.

Lieutenant-Colonel HOFFMAN:

COLONEL: I send by the train 4 prisoners, captured yesterday (with their arms and horses); all privates. The information gathered from these prisoners corroborates that I have already sent. The camp of the Sixty-third being at Wise's Cross-Roads and Ransom's brigade at Kinston.

Respectfully, yours,

HENRY PRINCE,

Brigadier-General Volunteers.