War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0633 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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in the enemy's position, so far as can be ascertained. He is still pressing my right, and hopes to first destroy the gunboats and then cross under his batteries. He will not succeed.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, April 18, 1863.

Major-General PECK:

I send a 12-pounder. I expect carriages from Washington to-day and will send you some Parrotts. I have asked General Halleck for some cavalry.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 18, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

The capture of Major-General French's engineer indicates some connection with North Carolina. General French ranks many of these officers, and would hardly come without a command. What is the latest from North Carolina?

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 18, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

We are as yesterday. The enemy is pressing on the river. Made several attacks on the Edenton road last night. Richmond Sentinel of 16th says:

Longstreet cannot fail. He is a great general, and has all the means for great success. Suffolk is to fall.

We shall see.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 18, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

We still hold the line of the Nansemond. During yesterday General Getty and the naval officers reported great activity on the part of the enemy in the lower part of the river, near West Branch; extensive works were being erected and everything indicated a purpose to cross under fire of their batteries. I re-enforced them to the extent of my ability, and sent down hay for the protection of the boats. The naval officers think one bridge is opposite Sleepy Hole, and works being erected.

The enemy was felt of smartly on all the roads yesterday and found in superior numbers at all points. Unless a diversion is made by General Hooker, or in some quarter, Longstreet will fortify a line and hold it as long as he can. I wish you would head a force at Smithfield, Hooker or Hunter should send you a corps.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.