War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0625 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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troops from the south side of James River you should occupy West Point and operate as here suggested. The movement if made should be prompt and rapid, so as to force the enemy to give up all attempts upon Suffolk and Norfolk.

Please inform me by telegraph whether you adopt my views, but without stating what they are.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

FORT MONROE, VA., April 17, 1863. (Received 9 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

We need field artillery at Suffolk by reason of the extent of our lines. If you can send two or three batteries it would be a great relief.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, April 17, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Everything quiet last night. Some fighting yesterday. I am going up the Nansemond this morning. Six thousand men have arrived. Yesterday we captured the equipage of a regiment.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, April 17, 1863.

Major-General PECK:

I know nothing of the organization of the troops that have come and are coming. I have sent you, with the Nineteenth Wisconsin and Ninth Vermont, about 5,000 men; more coming. In order not to lose to moment I have not stopped them here. You must use them as you think best. I am not even advised whether a general officer is coming; hope to learn this morning.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 27, 1863.

General DIX:

We are safe on the river. West End is probably below. One of the boats is working along up slowly in conjunction with the troops. I hold five points with artillery, and all the others awe guarded. General Hood cannot force the river now.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

40 R R-VOL XVIII