War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0623 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

NEW BERNE, N. C., April 16, 1863. (Received April 17, 6.20 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I left Washington, N. C., yesterday morning and run past the rebel batteries in the steamer Escort, which had reached Washington the previous night with the Fifth Rhode Island Volunteers and supplies on board. My object is to take the field at the head of the relieving forces and to fight a decisive battle, but I am not sure of the result. I have sent two dispatches for re-enforcements from the Department of Virginia, but understand none can be sent. General Naglee shows me General Cullum's dispatch of the 13th instant saying none can be sent from the Department of the South. I have to ask again, very respectfully, to have the detachment of the Eighteenth Army Corps, no in the Department of the South, ordered back as soon as possible, inasmuch as the rebel forces at Charleston, now liberated by the failure of the attack, will re-enforce the already large force in this State against which I am now contending. I left the troops in Washington in good spirits, the defenses good, and everything favorable for holding out as long as may be desired.

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General.

NEW BERNE, N. C., April 16, [1863]. (Received April 18, 11.35 a. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I have been obliged to concentrate my forces in sufficient numbers to meet the overpowering forces of the enemy and the evacuate Elizabeth City, Winfield, and Plymouth. This step was rendered necessary owing to information from Fort Monroe, showing that no re-enforcements could be expected from there, and from the telegram of General Cullum to General Naglee saying that no troops could be expected from the Department of the South.

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

NEW BERNE, N. C., April 16, 1863. (Received April 18, 11.20 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I have the honor to inform you that the advance of Heckman's brigade has arrived from the Department of the South. I am very grateful for this opportune re-enforcement, which will be of great service in the operations which, commencing to-morrow, will culminate in a battle in a few days. May I respectfully urge again the necessity of transferring the whole of the detachment of the Eighteenth Army Corps to North Carolina? My reason for reiterating this request is that re-enforcements are daily arriving to General D. H. Hill, and are supposed to be from vicinity of Charleston, though one of these regiments is known to be form Longstreet's force on the Blackwater. General Longstreet was with General Hill in conference the other day in front of Washington, N. C. The object and purpose of the consultation is not known, but must of