War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0620 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., April 16, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

Every transport that could be spared was sent with troops. When any of the vessels return it will be determined whether more troops can be sent to you.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 16, 1863. (Received 7.20 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

My lines are still secure. Only one gunboat is here. Two are feeling their way up, in concert in his operations against Suffolk. He assured his troops they would be in this place last Monday.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General, Commanding.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 16, 1863.

Major General JOHN A. DIX:

I hold the line of the river intact. Have urged the boats to feel their way up under our protection. All safe yet.

The enemy is cutting out extensive roads that we obstructed for miles, and will perhaps move around more to the right. Push on the men and guns.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, April 16, 1863.

General DIX and

General VIELE:

I have doubled my patrols on both railroads. Individuals are trying to get in and blow up the culverts. One of my me was killed while guarding the wire.

PECK,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 16, 1863.

General DIX:

Have been on my lines all day. We hold the enemy's forces in check, and I hope he will not be able to get over the river. Only to Smith Briggs is here. One or two boats are feeling their way up slowly in connection with the troops along the shore. Longstreet must be waiting for Hill, who can come by rail via Weldon. All parties distinctly state that such a combination was made. They want the whole line of the James a port for their iron-clads, and will ere long draw in their lines.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.