War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0606 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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SUFFOLK, VA., April 13 1863-9 p.m. (Received 10 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Longstreet's force is pretty well settled at 35,000. Co-operation of Hill expected. One division at least should be sent here, as they are fighting for the James River. He has one hundred and twenty pieces of artillery.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, April 13, 1863.

Major-General KEYES:

We have rations for about twelve days, including to-day. Please hurry up the stores as fast as possible.

JOHN J. PECK.

SUFFOLK, April 13, 1863.

Admiral S. P. LEE:

The enemy are said to be crossing at Sleepy Hole, below the mouth of the West Branch, where the river is wide. The river was left unprotected last night.

General Peck is at the front.

BENJ. B. FOSTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 13, 1863-4 p.m.

Major-General HOOKER,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

Intelligent and reliable deserters state that the force in my front, of 35,000 men, under Longstreet, has come form Fredericksburg is expectation of inaction on your part. D. H. Hill is said to be advancing from North Carolina.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, April 13, 1863.

General PECK,

Suffolk:

All of Longstreet's forces that have gone form here left in January and February last. None have left since. The enemy will be disappointed in the expectation you mention in your dispatch.

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., April 13, 1863-10 p. m.

Major-General HOOKER,

Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

Three divisions have been more or less engaged all day. Early this morning one division advanced on the Somerton front, driving in the pickets, but was promptly repulsed, and our picket line was intact at dark. Some fine skirmishing by Colonel Foster's Light Troop and