War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0555 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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showing the position of the gunboat at A, and I request that she may be required to be removed and placed as far west as B, and that this fort and the anchoring ground between it and Hampton be left open to the access of vessels, as it was under Admirals Goldsborough and Wilkes, not only to such as have army supplies but such as come here for shelter, subject to the usual revenue and military inspection, which is never omitted.

There is an immense contraband traffic carried on between the York and Rappahannock Rivers, and the steamer which is blockading us might render a valuable service in that quarter instead of creating annoyance to the army here.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, March 7, 1863.

Major-General DIX, Fort Monroe:

The proposed exchange reminds me that the infantry force here is very low, considering its very recent organization. Bayonets of men for duty, 7,100; aggregate, 8,300. Should an attack be made during stormy weather, when communication is interrupted between Old Point and Norfolk, the enemy might possibly gain some advantage.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, VA., March 9, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I have just received the following dispatch from General Peck:

SUFFOLK, VA., March 9, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

Colonel Dodge has just returned from Blackwater beyond Windsor. His advance was fired upon by rebel cavalry. He charged them, following down Bridge road, and captured 4, with 5 horses and other equipments. The party crossed over. His information is corroborative of all we have of the force of the enemy. Prisoners give twenty-odd thousand on the river. General Hill had been there, but thought he was not there now. Additional cavalry regiments are mentioned; also new batteries. Pryor not in command.

JOHN J. PECK.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, VA., March 9, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

The account of 20,000 men on the Blackwater is confirmed from many quarters. There s a large force at Petersburg and Drewry's Bluff. Very few troops at Richmond.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.