War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0534 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

Search Civil War Official Records

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, February 2, 1863.

Major-General DIX, Fort Monroe, Va.:

The Ninth Army Corps has received orders to report to you at Fort Monroe.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

UNITED STATES FLAG-SHIP MINNESOTA,

Newport News, February 2, 1863.

Major General JOHN A. DIX, U. S. A.,

Commanding Seventh Army corps, Fortress Monroe:

GENERAL: I have directed the guard vessel off Fort Monroe not to allow George Bush or his schooner, Elizabeth Bush, to pass the blockade again. He has, he says, been in the habit, under a permit from you, to take old rags, scrap-iron, and hides from Hampton to Philadelphia, bringing nothing back. By his own admission he has been in the habit of visiting Chuckatuck in his boat without authority, and as such communications are manifest violations of the blockade I have deemed it advisable to secure the public interest by cutting off his means of carrying information, letters, or property in the manner above indicated.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours,

S. P. LEE,

Acting Rear-Admiral.

SUFFOLK, VA., February 2, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

Unusual activity of the enemy reported to-day. Two hundred cavalry at Windsor; a large force at Carrsville, with an intermediate party. Have parties out.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, February 3, 1863.

Major-General PECK, Suffolk:

Within a week I expect to be largely re-enforced. I am anxious that Pryor shall not escape again. If he advances I suggest whether all the motive power of the railroad cannot be used to throw a force in his rear by a sudden movement.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, February 3, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

Very glad to learn of the expected troops. When Pryor comes I will hope to bag him. He tears up the road this side of Carrsville as often as I repair it, so that I could not use hand-cars. Supposed he was bagged the other day. He was where flanking was practicable on both flanks. Our people used up their ammunition before dawn and lost time waiting for more. Meantime enemy fell back.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.