War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0530 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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Also to-day I have put strong parties on the Neuse, the Trent, and the railroad with instructions to stop all passengers.

From information received yesterday I believe the enemy have returned from Core Creek, on the railroad and Neuse road, but I shall verify that fact to-day.

I learn also that the enemy at Goldsborough are apprehensive of an advance from New Berne simultaneous with our naval expedition. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. RICHTER JONES,

Commanding Outposts.

SUFFOLK, January 29, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

Major Stratton has returned. He seized and brought in 42 large sacks of salt. The other capture by Dodge's men is large; it is said there are many loads. Have just ordered out fifteen teams and a force to protect them. Pryor came over Sunday night perhaps with a view to the securing of this property.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

BEAUFORT, N. C., January 30 - 11.30 a. m.,

Via Fort Monroe, Va., February 8, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECk,

General-in-Chief:

The constant and strong southerly winds (amounting at times to gales) that have prevailed for the past ten or fifteen days have prevented our sailing, although most of the troops have been on board ready to sail more than a week. Yesterday the wind shifted to the northwest, and as everything looked favorable I started the fleet. Nearly all got over the bar before dark, with a fair start down the coast. The wind, however, shifted back to the southwest after dark, blew strongly, preventing the few remaining vessels going to sea. It is still blowing hard (11.30 a. m.) This will interfere very much with the progress of the fleet, and may scatter it considerably. As soon as the wind will permit I shall start with the remaining vessels. So long a continuance of southerly gales is very unusual.

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

FORT MONROE, VA., January 30, 1863.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President United States:

No iron-clads have left for two days. The Weehawken is at Norfolk; the Patapsco is here, waiting for favorable weather, and the Nahant is at Newport News. I have just telegraphed to General Halleck our success in a fight with Pryor.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.