War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0517 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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expects results proportionally. The detachment of Corcoran's will be ready to leave when required. It has been in one of the forts. What do you think of the map I sent you?

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, VA., January 15, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

I have just received the following from Suffolk:

A large force of the enemy left Carrsville during the day. They reported they were to be joined by other troops. The people there said they were going to Suffolk. Have sent out to ascertain their movements. A deserter from Weldon has just arrived. He left Monday morning; says several thousand infantry passed through on three days of last week for Franklin.

Also from Yorktown:

I send the following telegram, just received from Lieutenant-Colonel Lewis: "Can I have another regiment of infantry at once? If I can, I will hold Fort Magruder against odds; if not, I must continued to hold it as an outpost as long as I can."

E. D. KEYES,

Major-General.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, January 15, 1863.

Major-General KEYES, Yorktown:

I have nothing to give you. You must do the best you can. If your force is not sufficient to hold Fort Magruder it should be abandoned when the proper time comes. I am ordered to send one of your regiments away, but shall retain it till another comes.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTH ARMY CORPS,

Yorktown, Va., January 15, 1863.

Major-General DIX,

Commanding Department of Virginia:

SIR: The news contained in the telegram which I forwarded you to-day is in exact accordance with the opinion expressed in my last letter to you, that the rebels would shortly attack Williamsburg and the camp of the Fifth Pennsylvania Cavalry, 4 miles below that town.

My present command of conscript regiments of infantry, mostly armed with flint-lock muskets altered at Fort Magruder. I must therefore regard that and all the positions held by the Fifth Pennsylvania Cavalry as outposts to be given up on the approach of a large mass of the enemy. If I had another full regiment of infantry I could hold that time (of Fort Magruder) long enough to inflict much greater damage on the enemy than enough the balance the advantages they would gain, if successful; but I cannot do so now. I trust, therefore, that another regiment will be sent me if possible.

I remain, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

E. D. KEYES,

Major-General.