War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0513 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.- UNION.

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FORT MONROE, VA., January 13, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

The flag of truce just arrived from City Point reports great activity on the railroad south of Richmond. Cars were heard running all Sunday night; whether on the road to the Blackwater or Weldon is not quite certain. I have reports from two sources of the arrival of a heavy force at Zuni and of 12,000 men near Smithfield, on the James River. General Peck is trying to ascertain the truth.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, VA., January 13, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I have just received the following:

SUFFOLK, VA., January 13, 1863.

We have just learned from reliable women whose friends from the country have been in since Saturday that Pryor had 12,000 men, and that he was expecting more troops; that they would have Suffolk anyhow. Generally these reports do not disturb my attention, but now it is proper to notice them.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

SUFFOLK, VA., January 13, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

Spear reports Pryor to have recrossed, strengthening the river front, which is the weakest by far now. In all probability the gunboats would be crippled early.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, January 13, 1863.

Major-General PECK, Suffolk:

I understand from your dispatch that Pryor is on the other side of the Blackwater. But I do not understand what you mean when you say the gunboats would in all probability be crippled early.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., January 13, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

I intended saying that our water front is the weakest, and that I am strengthening it, lest the boats should be crippled early in case of a heavy attack. Their machinery is, of course, exposed.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

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