War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0510 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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SUFFOLK, VA., January 10, 1863.

Major-General DIX, Fort Monroe:

Reports from the front state the enemy's force in the region of Windsor at 6,000, with six piece - probably from four to six. Spear advanced so far toward Somerton yesterday that he could not possibly get to the position indicated until ten or twelve hours after the time. He must now be near Windsor with 4,000, and ten pieces.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

UNITED STATES FLAG-SHIP MINNESOTA,

Newport News, Va., January 10, 1863.

Major General JOHN A. DIX, U. S. A.,

Commanding Seventh Army Corps, Fortress Monroe, Va.:

GENERAL: Your reply to my communication of Thursday evening was received yesterday, and I am very much gratified by the kind terms in which you express your regret at the occurrence referred to.

I desire to thank you for referring to me the letter of the master of the steamer Champion on the 31st ultimo, and to state that Commander Foxhall A. Parker, senior naval officer in York River and vicinity, reported to me in reply to my inquiries with regard to the supposed violation of the blockade at Mob Jack Bay, as observed by Captain Low, that vessels in heavy weather or when wind-bound have been accustomed to make a harbor of that bay under the protection of the guns of the United States steamer Crusader. Hence probably the error of Captain Low. Commander Parker is confident from his knowledge of the blockade in that vicinity that nothing larger than a canoe has succeeded in running that blockade since November 19, and even then under favor of night or thick weather.

I will always be glad to hear of any attempt to evade or violate the blockade. In this spirit I beg to inform you that the officer commanding the United States steamer Stepping Stores reported to me under date of the 3rd as follows:

The most popular route for transportation of goods and information from Norfolk and Portsmouth appears to be by the Dismal Swamp road and Chowan, and by this route a surprising quantity of goods are smuggled into the enemy's lines.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours,

S. P. LEE,

Actg. Rear-Admiral, Commanding N. Atlantic Blockading Squadron.

SUFFOLK, VA., January 10, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

General Pryor is in command. We have captured messengers with a dispatch for him from Franklin, informing him that a column of 6,000 was approaching, referring to our moves yesterday.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, VA., January 10, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

The following is correct: Pryor has on this side 14 pieces, 7,000 infantry, and 1,500 cavalry. He crossed at Franklin, learning that we were