War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0508 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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FORT MONROE, VA., January 9, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

The enemy appeared yesterday in considerable force on this side of the Blackwater, and has been attacking our pickets about 12 miles from Suffolk with all arms since morning. The Richmond papers mention that a large number of our troops have been withdrawn and sent to North Carolina, and it would be surprising if the enemy should concentrate a heavy force an attack us, unless the Army of the Potomac can keep him busy.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, VA., January 9, 1863.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

The One hundred and fifteenth New York, which you sent me last week, is ordered to the Department of the South by Secretary of War, for burning the barracks at Chicago.* The regiment is at Yorktown, where I am weak, and I do not wish to take any troops from Suffolk to supply its place. Can you not send me another regiment?

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

NEW BERNE, N. C., January 9, 1863.

Lieutenant Colonel SOUTHWARD HOFFMAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Eighteenth Army Corps:

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit to you the report of Major George W. Cole, of this regiment, of a reconnaissance made by him toward Core Creek; also in regard to the alarm at our picket station at the brick-yard, near railroad bridge, on the evening of the 76th instant.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

SIMON H. MIX,

Colonel, Commanding Third New York Volunteer Cavalry.

[Inclosures.]

NEW BERNE, January 8, 1863.

Colonel S. H. MIX,

Commanding Third New York Volunteer Cavalry:

COLONEL: I have the honor to report having obeyed the order and proceeded to the fork of the Dover and Neuse roads. I sent detachments to the bridges on Core Creek, and also to Street's Ferry. Lieutenant Hall, of Company G, went within 30 feet of the bridge on the Dover road, learning that a company of Whitford's were holding the rifle-pits beyond and were daily coming across - several yesterday.

Captain Pierce went within 300 yards, or near it, of the bridge on the Neuse road; found no pickets in sight, but learned that Captain Avirett, of Alabama, with about 90 men, was holding the pits on the Neuse, and that some 20 of his men were passing the road a few hours before,

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