War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0502 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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NORFOLK, January 1, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

I have taken every precaution to prevent disturbances to-day. I know the procession will be a source of deep mortification to the insolent secessionists here, but I have not fell like pleasing them by stopping it. It will be certainly very harmless as fare as the negroes are concerned. If I knew the name of the person you refer to I would arrest him.

EGBERT L. VIELE,

Brigadier-General.

NORFOLK, January 1, 1863.

Major-General DIX:

The precession passed off without any disturbance. There were about 4,000 persons in it.

EGBERT L VIELE,

Brigadier-General.

FORT MONROE, VA.,

January 2, 1862 - 4 p. m.

Major-General HALLECK, General-in-Chief, and General M. C. MEIGS, Quartermaster-General:

I have been exceedingly unlucky in regard to transports for troops to North Carolina. The New York and Georgia, after being loaded, were given up as unseaworthy. The Connecticut was loaded with wagons and horses, and came down from Yorktown this morning, but her crew refused to go to sea. On examination she also proves unseaworthy, and i am now trying to get the John Brooks to take them. She has just arrived for service at Washington, and her captain objects to going to sea, as her boilers are on her guards. The weather is very fine and I think she will go. In that case the Connecticut will take her place at Washington. Ten thousand troops have gone; there are 2,000 to go. The Cahawba should have been back last night with a transport sailing vessel in tow. If they get in to-nigh there will be time to meet General Foster's arrangements. I though you ought to know the insufficiency of your steamboats for emergencies.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA, SEVENTH ARMY CORPS,

Fort Monroe, January 3, 1863.

Major General J. G. FOSTER,

Commanding Department of North Carolina:

GENERAL: We have been very unfortunate in transports. We have had to unload two, and two others returned here from Beaufort broken down. To-night I send you 1,000 men in the Cahawba; to-morrow, 800 in the Expounder. There will be but 100 or 200 left; these I expect to send to-morrow night.

The aggregate force I have set apart for you is 14,000. You will have 12,000 effectives. I retain the sick.