War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0496 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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commands you may have for Washington or me. Let me know if I can do anything here.

Wishing you a success equal to that at Goldsborough, I am, respectfully and truly, yours,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

P. S. - I found a change in the troops at Suffolk necessary. You will get-

1. Ferry's brigade, including 300 of Wessells' men....... 3,600

2. Spinola's brigade..................................... 4,000

3. Naglee's brigade...................................... 4,080

4. Independent Battalion, New York....................... 250

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11,930

Some convalescents will carry the number, I think, above 12,000.

FORT MONROE, VA., December 29, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

General Foster's arrangements with me was to have everything in North Carolina by the 4th proximo, before which day he could not be ready to land and prepare the troops to march. The day for marching was fixed for the 8th. I think it proper to advise you of these arrangements and what I have done. I have just sent a special messenger to him with the following information:

Four thousand troops left Suffolk for Chowan River yesterday morning; 4,500 left and to leave by water and to-day, remaining 3,500 leave as facts as transports arrive-part to morrow and the rest by January 2 at farthest. One hundred tons ammunition 2,000 spades and shovels, and 10,000 sand-bags leave to-morrow.

Part of wagons and ambulance go with troops; the rest in time.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, VA., December 29, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Colonel Gibbs was sent out early yesterday morning toward the Blackwater to occupy the attention of the enemy while a force of 4,000 men for General Foster went down to the Chowan. The colonel fell in with the enemy's scouts a short distance from our pickets, drove them, and captured 9. They report Pryor 4 miles on this side of the Blackwater with two brigades of infantry, two regiments of cavalry, and nine pieces of artillery. I send Corcoran's brigade from Newport News to Suffolk to-day. General Ferry will leave Suffolk with 3,500 men as fast as transportation can be furnished, commencing this evening. The Fourth Delaware and One hundred and fifteenth New York have arrived at Yorktown, where my infantry was reduced to 1,700 by the withdrawal of Naglee's brigade. Two or three good regiments in addition to those I have would enable me to drive Pryor across the Blackwater, unless he is re-enforced. To give success to General Foster's movements I beg to suggest that General Burnside should press the enemy incessantly.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.