War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0474 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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Point awaiting the movements of Mr. Ould, the commissioner for the exchange of prisoners, and distinctly heard the trains moving on the railroad both by night and day. It may be that the enemy are concentrating troops at Petersburg in anticipation of a landing on our part on the south side of James River. I feel a good deal of confidence that I shall in case of an offensive movement in the direction of Norfolk receive timely advices unless my agent is detected and arrested.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, December 7, 1862.

General DIX:

Wessells arrived at noon on the 6th; reports no transports there; a barren waste, stripped of almost everything; no cattle there. He will get along without difficulty through the 7th. F. [Flusser?] will be there to-day unless some terrible storm sweeps the coast.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, December 7, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

Colonel Spear's estimate was between 7,000 and 8,000 at and in the vicinity of Franklin, along the river. To-day an old contraband came in from a plantation just this side of Franklin to get liberty. He says two regiments have arrived by the engine from Weldon and some artillery recently; also that the Nottoway bridge is complete.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, VA.,

December 8, 1862-1 p. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Your inquiry in regard to the commander at Norfolk induces me to inform you that I have ordered an election of a member of Congress in that district and have charged General Viele with some of the necessary arrangements. I will write by mail to-morrow.*

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, December 8, 1862.

Major-General PECK:

I have but one old regiment here, and that is the only force in the fort. You must do your best with the troops you have. Have all your forces ready to move on short notice. Have a thorough inspection of arms, clothing, and equipage. Have also an abundant supply of ammunition. Make requisitions for all deficiencies as soon as possible.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

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* Correspondence in relation to that election will appear in Series III.

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