War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0470 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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FORT MONROE, December 3, 1862.

Major-General PECK, Suffolk:

With Jourdan's regiment you will have five new ones and over 3,000 additional troops. The Pennsylvania regiments are of the very best material. Has Colonel Spear returned? Did he command the expedition? How many men had he? How many prisoners have you taken? When was the rocket battery taken from our army? Give me details at once; I wish to write General Halleck.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

FORT MONROE, December 4, 1862.

Major-General PECK, Suffolk:

The new regiments are designate to be a part of your command. Make requisitions for all they need. They did not land here, and I supposed them fully supplied. The shoes, &c., wanted by General Wessells were sent early this morning by steamer Arago. Make requisitions for better tents. I have been promised arms from Washington, but cannot get them.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

New Berne, N. C., December 4, 1862.

Major General S. G. FRENCH,

Commanding Department of North Carolina, Petersburg, Va.:

GENERAL: Your favor of November 27 I have the honor to acknowledge. I had previously received from General Martin a letter on the same subject, and as my answer to him covers most of the ground in yours I beg leave to inclose a copy. I beg to say in relation to postscript of your letter that not a negro, to the best of my belief, was forcibly abducted from his owner, and indeed I only suffered those to follow who insisted upon so doing. There were fifteen houses (says General Martin) burned at Hamilton; the fact I deplore. At Williamston two were burned from a defect in the flue of the chimney, as shown by investigation, and one small house pulled down to prevent the spread of the fire. Members of my staff were in each house and none of them saw horses in the parlors, though in one or two instances on piazzas; family carriages (not over three) may have been taken to transport sick men, not to destroy or abandoned. That houses of peaceful citizens with the families in occupancy were entered, women and children insulted and robbed, I do not believe, as the provost-marshal heard nothing of the kind so gross as you report. In respect to that part of your letter as to the treatment of any officers not as prisoners of war, I would say that if after my letter your Government proposes to act on that principle I beg that you will have me informed for the regulation of my own course.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

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* See p. 36.

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