War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0465 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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FORT MONROE, November 27, 1862.

Major-General PECK:

I have just received a letter from General Foster, at New Berne, saying he may ask my co-operation in an important movement about the 5th of December. Has your expedition gone? A week ago General French was at Petersburg with 4,000 men. I have nothing later.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, November 27, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

Mud and water have delayed our move. The enemy are signaling between here and the Blackwater.

JOHN J. PECK.

FORT MONROE, November 27, 1862.

Major-General PECK:

Perhaps it would be as well to wait till I hear from General Foster. In that case I will send an officer to him to-morrow. What do you think?

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA, SEVENTH ARMY CORPS,

Fort Monroe, Va., November 27, 1862.

Major General J. G. FOSTER,

Commanding Department of North Carolina:

GENERAL: I only received this evening your letter of the 14th instant. It is now too late for me to meet you, but if you will send by Lieutenant Mabie, who will take this dispatch to you, any communication which will indicate your wishes I will endeavor to meet them. I have not a large force at Suffolk, but sufficient to make a diversion on the Blackwater. The enemy are now turning their attention to the Suffolk route to Petersburg. They have recently put the railroad from the latter city to the Blackwater in order, but I have changed the gauge on this side so that they cannot use it. They are repairing the bridge on the Seaboard Railroad over the Nottoway so that they can re-enforce on the Blackwater from Weldon. I can attack at Franklin, where the Seaboard Railroad reaches the Blackwater (Carrsville on the maps), or at Zuni, where the Petersburg strikes the same river; or if I can aid you by a different movement let me know and I will do all in my power.

I had an expedition organized under Major-General Peck to move on Zuni to-morrow with 5,000 men, but since the receipt of yours have countermanded it in order to make the time suit you.

I am, respectfully and truly, yours,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

30 R R-VOL XVIII