War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0460 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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SUFFOLK, November 19, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

The cars were running from Petersburg to Zuni all last night, and it is presumed with additions of force. This information has just come in, and I doubt not accounts for the signals. Probably intending to strike here in the absence of one-half of my force, or strike Wessells in the flank. Colonel Dodge is going out toward Zuni to watch any movements.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, November 19, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

A courier is just in from the commander of Winfield, N. C., and of the gunboat there; states 200 rebel infantry crossed Chowan and are threatening the region. Lieutenant Etheridge is near the gunboat with his party and has destroyed their boats. They attacked the camp last night.

Wessells is in with his force.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, November 19, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

The Weldon road is now in complete order to the Nottoway, 5 1\2 miles from Franklin. I have positive information that they are building the bridge across that river.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA, SEVENTH ARMY CORPS,

Fort Monroe, Va., November 19, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

GENERAL: I have the honor to inclose six telegraphic dispatches from Major-General Peck.*

I wrote to General Foster soon after I saw you in Washington, offering to co-operate with him, and promising at least a demonstration on the Blackwater which might produce a diversion in his favor. I have had no answer from him and have acted on the presumption that my letter never reached him, although in sending expeditions to the Blackwater I have influenced also by the desire to accustom my troops to marching, bivouacking, &c., and to the fire of the enemy.

I inclose a map of the district between Suffolk and the Blackwater, on which a map of the district drawn.+

Will you please let the President see the accompanying telegraphic dispatches, which may throw a little light on my dispatch to him yesterday?

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

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* Probably those of 18th and 19th, pp. 458-460.

+ Not found.

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