War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0459 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

artillery and infantry at Franklin (Carrsville on the maps) and the fords blocked. A sharp skirmish was going on across the river, which is very narrow higher up. The enemy is on this side of the Blackwater, and our pickets are engaged almost every night. The moment I can get any relieve information as to the force in Richmond and Petersburg I will forward it. I have reason to believe that the force specified in the district embraced in the enumeration at the beginning of this dispatch is reduced rather than increased. In twelve hours it can be concentrated either at Richmond or Petersburg.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

FORT MONROE, VA., November 18, 1862.

General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I have just received the following dispatch from Major-General Peck, at Suffolk, viz:

A communication has just been received by the surgeon of the One hundred and thirty-second New York, from headquarters Banks' expedition, medical director, ordering immediately certain export about officers, ambulances, &c. It came direct. I ask for explanation and for instructions. We need more troops here, and can hardly afford to lose this regiment.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

Independently of the impropriety of asking information from my subordinates, except through me, I must request that this regiment may not be taken from me. Indeed, General Casey has only sent me three of the four regiments he was ordered to send. I have sent 4,000 men to the Blackwater to-day, with a view to cross. Our vessels have been fired on almost every night for a week. At Gloucester yesterday we lost 6 men in killed and wounded and 3 taken prisoners. We captured 3 and did about the same damage to the enemy.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, November 19, 1862.

Major General JOHN A. DIX:

No orders have been given to my knowledge for any part of your command to report to Major-General Banks.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

NOVEMBER 19, 1862.

Major-General DIX, Fort Monroe:

Wessells remained all night at Beaver Dam Church, a shot distance from Franklin, and moved at dawn.

The rebels were telegraphing over the country with various colored lights until long after midnight.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.