War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0454 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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This will have much effect on pending operations about Weldon and Petersburg. Can you not give me Jourdan's regiment? Shall send Wessells in command. If whatever should be unfavorable will delay.

Getting boats ready for a bridge.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF VIRGINIA, SEVENTH ARMY CORPS,

Fort Monroe, Va., November 15, 1862.

P. H. WATSON, Esq.,

Assistant Secretary of War:

I have just received your communication of the 13th instant.

Please say to the Secretary of War that his wishes have been in every particular anticipated:

1st. I had an estimate made two weeks ago of the principal articles needed for the population within our lines at Norfolk and vicinity. I am reducing it to greater precision by an actual enumeration of the inhabitants, considerably diminished in number by the war since the last census.

2nd. I have opened a set of books in which are to be entered, under their proper heads, each article and the quantity of each article for which permits are granted and also the quantities actually received, so that the footings of each day will exhibit the aggregate of both.

No effort will be spared to prevent abuse.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX.,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, November 15, 1862.

Major General JOHN A. DIX,

Commanding, Fort Monroe, Va.:

GENERAL: A letter was addressed to you by this Department, under date of the 13th instant, in relation to permits to trade with Norfolk, Portsmouth, and Suffolk. The Secretary of War directs me to inform you that as the action of which you will be duly advised is contemplated there will be no necessity for compliance on your part with the suggestions contained in the communication above refereed to.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. H. WATSON,

Assistant Secretary of War.

FORT MONROE, November 15, 1862.

Major-General PECK:

I approve of your plan. If you cross only 1,500 cavalry they must be free from all incumbrances, so as to move rapidly, and you should have the residue of your force ready to move to their support if assailed by superior numbers. Try to make the officers and men feel that they are equal to double their numbers, as I believe they are.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.