War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0413 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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does not decide her case as a special one but states the rule which covers it.

Thee Delaware, which has taken the place of the Morse, is precisely what we want. With the West End, a heavy tug which I have armed, we shall have an efficient river defense. I do not know what instructions you have given the commander of the Delaware, and I will be much obliged to you if you will request him to act in conjunction with the West End, under the direction of Major-General Peck, who will be advised of all exigencies as they arise and know how to meet them.

I am, admiral, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN. A. DIX,

Major-General.

UNITED STATES FLAG-SHIP MINNESOTA,

Off Newport News, October 2, 1862.

Major General JOHN. A. DIX, U. S. A.,

Commanding Seventh Army Corps, Fortress Monroe, Va.:

GENERAL: Your communication of the 1st instant is received. I do not see that the letter of the Secretary of the Treasury to Mr. Cutting respecting the schooner Marblehead allows anything more than that she may be cleared without a cargo of merchandise. This view is consistent with my instructions of September 18 from the Secretary of the Navy, which I read to you, and the substance of which I wrote to you on the 23rd ultimo. The conclusion you arrive at and the course you propose seem to me to be clearly in conflict with my orders. Your communication and this reply will, however, be referred to the Department for its consideration and decision.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. P. LEE,

Actg. Rear-Admiral, Commanding N. Atlantic Blockading Squadron.

UNITED STATES FLAG-SHIP MINNESOTA,

Off Newport News, October 3, 1862.

Major General JOHN. A. DIX, U. S. A.,

Commanding Seventh Army Corps, Fort Monroe, Va.:

GENERAL: My instructions to the commanding naval officer in the Nansemond River are to go up as near as he can to the West Branch of that river and prevent the enemy from crossing there; to endeavor to intercept rebel mails passing along there and between Norfolk and Richmond, and to avail himself of such information as General Peck, from his position, may be enabled to give, in order to facilitate a co-operation with General Peck's forces, or otherwise, as may be best, against the enemy. I hope General Peck will communicate freely with our gun-boat.

I sent the Morse to-day to relieve the Delaware, the latter to go outside awhile. The Morse is the more efficient vessel of the two, as she is a double-ender and does not have to turn in that narrow stream, in doing which I fear the Delaware has got aground as she has not yet returned.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours,

S. P. LEE,

Actg. Rear-Admiral, Commanding N. Atlantic Blockading Squadron.