War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0405 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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should be given to the inhabitants of Norfolk, & c., in order that those of them might leave who should avoid personal exposure to our fire, whilst defending the place if attacked by the rebel forces.

I submit to you that in order to avoid all embarrassments to an efficient defense arising from delay in giving this notice, we should, as soon as you think it necessary to do so, give such public notice to the inhabitants of Norfolk and Portsmouth, to foreign consuls and their families therein residing, as may be proper.

I invite your advice and co-operation in the premises and submit herewith the within for your consideration and amendment. I think the matter demands our immediate attention.

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant,

S. P. LEE,

Actg. Rear-Admiral, Commanding N. Atlantic Blockading Squadron.

[Inclosure.]

Official notice is hereby given to all non-combatants, foreign consuls, & c., that the present threatened attack by the rebel forces on Suffolk, an outpost of Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va., makes it necessary to notify them that if they shall continue to reside in these towns they will do so at their own peril, and must take the consequences that may ensue from the exposure they will encounter during the defense of Norfolk and Portsmouth by the military and naval forces of the United States.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

S. P. LEE,

Actg. Rear-Admiral, Commanding N. Atlantic Blockading Squadron.

To be communicated through General Viele to the authorities and inhabitants of Norfolk and Portsmouth, to each foreign consul, and to be published in the Norfolk Union newspapers.

HEADQUARTERS SEVENTH ARMY CORPS,

Fort Monroe, Va., September 25, 1862.

Actg. Rear-Admiral S. P. LEE,

Commanding North Atlantic Blockading Squadron:

ADMIRAL: I have had the honor to receive your communication of this morning in regard to the threatened attack of the rebels on Suffolk. The question of giving the notice of which you inclose a draught is a very important and delicate one and I desire time to consider it. There has been as yet no movement this side of the Blackwater, and it appears to me that an advance should precede such a notice, which would induce a large number of the inhabitants of Norfolk to leave and devolve on us the obligation of passing them through our lines. If we intended to make the attack there would be no question as to the propriety of giving the notice.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.