War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0401 Chapter XXX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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SUFFOLK, September 23, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

Arrived in good season. Have been over most of the approaches. The work is being pushed. No report as yet from Colonel Spear's reconnaissance.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

SUFFOLK, September 23, 1862.

Major-General DIX:

I have received a report from Colonel Spear, commanding reconnaissance, to this effect: He found first picket of enemy 3 miles this side Franklin; drove them. Proceeded a mile farther and met the enemy in some force at junction of South Quay and Franklin roads; enemy fell back. One mile from Franklin, cavalry and infantry picket; drove that and proceeded half mile farther. Enemy opened with artillery; reconnaissance halted and reconnoitered vicinity. Five thousand infantry at Franklin on both sides river; 2,000 at South Quay; 1,200 at Preston's Ferry. Floating bridge across Blackwater; [can] cross cars or artillery. Strict guard kept.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, D. C., September 24, 1862.

Major General JOHN A. DIX, Fort Monroe:

The defense of the points occupied by you is necessarily left to your discretion. You will retain Peck's division and I will send you as soon as possible four more new regiments. The calls of General McClellan for re-enforcements and the tardy movements of new troops render it difficult to satisfy all demands.

I do not insist upon your holding all points now in your possession. In that matter you must be guided by the best interests of the country.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA,

New Berne, N. C., September 24, 1862.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to say that some time since I made a formal application to the honorable Secretary of War for more troops for this department. This application was made previous to the great answer made by the loyal States to the President's call for troops.

I learn now that large numbers of new regiments are pouring into Washington, and beg your attention, therefore, to my request for more troops, and in this connection I beg leave to say that, seeing the turn affairs are taking in Virginia and Maryland, the occupation in force of this department may be most advantageous to the campaign. The

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