War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0358 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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burg Railroad, 5 mils this side of Zuni, yesterday, and was promptly and handsomely repulsed. The rails we are removing are very heavy, but they will all be at Suffolk by Thursday.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

Numbers 2. Reports of Major General John J. Peck, U. S. Army, commanding at Suffolk.

MAY 17, 1863.

General Dodge does not think there is any large force about Smithfield. Major Patton had taken 5 men and 6 horses; when returning, his rear guard was surprised and driven on the command, and in the fight a bridge broke, letting down about 12 of his party, making confusion. The prisoners escaped.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

Major-General DIX.

MAY 18, 1863.

General Dodge went out with all the force of cavalry, about 140, to Smithfield. On the return of the party, Major Patton was attacked by about 300 in a swamp and had a heroic fight. He was wounded in three places and his horse wounded several times. His men did well.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

General DIX.

MAY 18, 1863.

I sent General Dodge to Scott's Mill and he made a very bold reconnaissance with only about 140 men. It was on the return that the attack was made on the Cypress Mill road, 3 miles from Providence Church-not on our maps. Major Patton fought well. His move was signaled and they were ready for him.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

General DIX.

MAY 20, 1863.

Major Stratton reports the affair at Newby's Bridge as highly creditable on the part of Lieutenant Titus and his small detachment. Lieutenant Beatty, so severely wounded and left, has been brought in and is doing well. They had 5 killed and a number wounded, while our loss was 4 wounded.

JOHN J. PECK,

Major-General.

Major-General DIX.