War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0310 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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carried about 7 o'clock p. m., and this command marched immediately. On arriving at Dr. Council's no boat was ready to take the command over. About 10 o'clock p. m. Captain Vallee received an order to return with his section of artillery to Calhoun's Point. The One hundred and seventeenth New York Volunteers, 720 strong, remained in the road until about 12 p. m., and received an order to report to Colonel Donohoe, Tenth New Hampshire Volunteers, about 1 1/2 miles above Dr. Council's. The regiment reported as ordered, and about 2.30 p. m. on the 20th an order was sent to send four companies of the One hundred and seventeenth New York Volunteers back to Dr. Council's house to embark for Hill's Point. A special order was received from the commanding general for the colonel of the One hundred and seventeenth New York Volunteers to take command of the four companies of his regiment and accompany them to Hill's Point. Companies D, F, H, and K were the companies sent over; they arrived at 4 o'clock p. m. and began to intrench. A detail was made from the companies to furnish skirmishers. The skirmishers were deployed and exchanged shots with the enemy, in which First Sergt. William Casselman, Company D, One hundred and seventeenth New York Volunteers, was severely wounded in the right leg by a rifle-ball from the enemy's skirmishers. The first fire applied to the building on Hill's Point was set by Second Lieutenant D. B. Magill, One hundred and seventeenth New York Volunteers, who volunteered to perform the service. At 10 o'clock a. m. on the 20th the remainder of the regiment arrived and reported and were set to work intrenching. At 3 o'clock p. m. the order to evacuate the Point was issued. The embarkation commenced on one of the gunboats, and after landing about 400 men on the marsh opposite Hill's Point the small boats were substituted, and the crossing of all was completed about 12.30 a. m. on the morning of the 21st. All reached their old camp in safety.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. R. PEASE,

Colonel, Commanding One hundred and seventeenth N. Y. Vols.

Captain HAZARD STEVENS,

Asst. Adjt. General, Third Division, Ninth Army Corps.

HDQRS. ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTEENTH N. Y. VOLS.,

Calhoun's Point, Va., April 22, 1863-8.30 a. m.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report all quiet on this end of the line. No movement of the enemy discovered last night; no evidences of any parties working during the night. If we could have the use of a 12-pounder boat howitzer it would be very effective indeed in preventing the enemy from placing artillery in the battery on the opposite shore. Captain Morris informs me that the howitzer can be obtained from Captain Cushing, on the gunboat. I have a four-gun battery nearly completed, and respectfully request that the remainder of Captain Vallee's pieces be sent down. There was no movement of the gunboats during the night.

Very respectfully, captain, your obedient servant,

W. R. PEASE,

Colonel, Commanding One hundred and seventeenth N. Y. Vols.

Captain STEVENS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.