War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0272 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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signed to General Getty, and One hundred and sixty-ninth New York Volunteers, assigned to General Corcoran.

April 19.-Detachment of the Third New York Volunteers and the First Delaware, Sixteenth and Nineteenth New York Batteries.

April 17.-The Ninth Vermont was assigned to General Getty and transferred, April 24, to the Reserve Brigade. The Twenty-sixth Michigan and One hundred and fifty-second New York assigned to General Corcoran.

April 22.-The Tenth Jersey was assigned to General Corcoran and the One hundred and eighteenth New York assigned to Reserve Brigade.

The following officers were killed and wounded during the month:

April 8.-Captain Bowdish, commissary of subsistence; killed by accident on the railroad.

April 12.-Lieutenant Colonel Edgar A. Kimball, Ninth New York Volunteers; killed by Brigadier General M. Corcoran while on duty.

April 23.-Captain John E. White, Ninety-ninth New York Volunteers; wounded by rebel sharpshooters.

April 24.-Surg, James Wilson, Ninety-ninth New York Volunteers; wounded by rebel sharpshooters. Second Lieutenant B. Conron, Thirteenth Indiana Volunteers; killed in skirmish on Somerton road. Colonel C., Buell, One hundred and sixty-ninth on Somerton road. Colonel C. Buell One hundred and sixty-ninth New York Volunteers; wounded in skirmish on Somerton road. Major Alonzo Alden, One hundred and Sixty-ninth New York Volunteers; wounded in skirmish on Somerton road.

April 15.-Captain J. McAnally, One hundred and fifty-fifth New York Volunteers; wounded in the skirmish on Edenton road.

April 24.-Second Lieutenant T. J. Cantwell, One hundred and sixty-fourth New York Volunteers; wounded in the skirmish on Edenton road.

May 1.-The Ninety-ninth New York Volunteers had a skirmish with the enemy on South Quay road, near Suffolk. Loss: killed, 4; wounded, 42.

May 2.-Two companies of the Third Pennsylvania Artillery reported.

May 3.-Reconnaissance on the Petersburg road by General Getty; enemy driven from their rifle-pits on their main line. Loss, killed and wounded, 60. After dark the enemy abandoned the siege of Suffolk, retiring in haste toward the Blackwater.

May 4.-Colonel Foster commenced pursuit after the enemy, coming on the rear guard at Leesville, which were dispersed and most of them captured. General Corcoran pursued them on the Edenton road, General Terry on the South Quay road, and a cavalry detachment on the Petersburg road, but all were unable to come across any force. Many prisoners were captured, mostly stragglers (about 250), including 4 officers. One hundred and thirty signified their willingness to take the oath of allegiance and were sent North.

Numbers 3.

Report of Captain Charles L. Davis, Eighty-second Pennsylvania Infantry, Chief Signal Officer.

OFFICE OF CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER, DEPT. OF VA.,

Fort Monroe, Va., May 9, 1863.

COLONEL: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the Signal Corps in the siege of Suffolk, lasting from April 11 to May 2:

For some months past I have had a signal station on a tree near the