War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0212 NORTH CAROLINA AND S. E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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will regard my application for the immediate return of this detachment as tending to meet a necessity of the war.

Referring to the pressing necessity for immediate re-enforcements to relieve me at this place, I would respectfully suggest that the 5,000 men be sent temporarily from General Dix's command and with the utmost expedition.

I understand, from an officer who came through the blockade, that General Palmer has already made the above request in substance of General Dix.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

Commander-in-Chief U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

NEW BERNE, N. C., VIA FORT MONROE, VA.,

April 23, 1863-3 p. m.

I left New Berne on the morning of the 18th with a force to raise the siege at Washington. Our advance of cavalry, with Brigadier-General Naglee, came upon the enemy's rear-guard of cavalry near Washington, and, after driving it several miles, routed it, capturing their battle-flag and taking a surgeon and 5 men prisoners, killing and wounding several. The cavalry were still following their retreat yesterday. I found that the main body withdrew from before Washington with the artillery on the night of the 15th. General Potter immediately leveled their batteries in front of the town, and after occupying Hill's and Rodman's Points made a dash after the retiring force, capturing 2 officers and a drum-major. Everything is now secure.

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF NORTH CAROLINA, 18TH ARMY CORPS,

New Berne, N. C., April 30, 1863.

GENERAL: I have the honor to make the following report in relation too the siege of Washington, N. C.:

Learning an attack was to be made upon Washington I left here, with several members of my staff, for that place, arriving there at 7.30 a. m. on March 30. The garrison of the place was eight companies of the forty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, eighth companies of the Twenty-seventh Massachusetts Volunteers, two companies of the First North Carolina (Union) Volunteers, one company of the Third New York Cavalry, and one company of the Third New York Artillery. After making an examination of the works and giving necessary orders as to strengthening them I at once sent out a reconnaissance of one company of the Forty-fourth Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, one piece of artillery, and a few cavalry men to ascertain if the enemy held the cross-roads 3 miles from Washington. When about 1 1/2 miles from