War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0161 Chapter XXX. DEMONSTRATION ON KINSTON, N. C.

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Carolina Cavalry, but what numbers of either regiment were in front did not appear, the enemy keeping closely under cover and the country being thickly wooded. They are a different class of troops from those I have hitherto met, contesting successively every strong position and giving way only to my superior numbers. Their arms are also different, being, from the whistle of the bullets, the Minie or others of similar tone.

From the information of negroes it would seem that some general officer (General French, some of them say) visited their posts on Wednesday last, ordered the line of Core Creek to be reoccupied, and brought re-enforcements. Also yesterday, while I was on my return, the whistle of a locomotive was heard some distance up the railroad toward Kinston, and on the supposition that fresh troops might be brought up I took a strong position and awaited a couple of hours, but no show of increase of force being made I resumed my march.

On the whole, my movement effected nothing beyond driving back some of the enemy's posts and accustoming our men to la petite guerre. As to capturing their men, that will be difficult while they hold the line of Core Creek and impose on us the necessity of forcing a passage every time we cross.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. RICHTER JONES,

Colonel Fifty-eighth Pennsylvania Vols., Commanding Outposts.

Lieutenant Colonel SOUTHARD HOFFMAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Eighteenth Army Corps.

HDQRS. OUTPOSTS, CAMP FIFTY-EIGHTH PA. VOLS.,

March 10, 1863.

SIR: In reference to the surrender of the enemy's picket in the breastwork on the Dover road beyond Core Creek I have the honor to report the following facts:

As soon as the sentinel at the enemy's works fired I opened a rapid fire from the two companies which had been previously placed under cover along the near bank of the creek. Our fire was answered immediately by about twenty pieces, and for a few minutes there was a brisk exchanged of shots. Then the enemy's fire suddenly ceased Standing a few yards from the bridge, which my storming party was endeavoring to cross, I heard my officers on the right and left give the command, "Cease firing; they've surrendered," and our fire almost immediately ceased. On inquiry afterward I was informed by officers and non-commissioned officers that they distinctly heard from the enemy's side of the creek the words, "We surrender; don't fire," several times repeated. It was very dark at the time and the passage of the bridge on the single remaining string-piece difficult, so that it cost my men some time to cross and form beyond the creek, and when they entered the enemy's works they were empty. As the ground rises rapidly to the rear of the breastwork it would have been hazardous to leave them if our fire had not ceased, and I attribute the escape of the picket to the cessation of our fire, consequent on the supposition of the surrender.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. RICHTER JONES,

Colonel, Commanding Outposts.

Lieutenant Colonel SOUTHARD HOFFMAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Eighteenth Army Corps.

11 R R-VOL XVIII