War of the Rebellion: Serial 026 Page 0068 NORTH CAROLINA AND S.E. VIRGINIA. Chapter XXX.

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Companies B, E, and H, and one of Allis' mountain howitzers, all of this regiment. My instructions were to simply make a feint toward Goldsborough and to capture any of the stragglers that might be found. I was also cautioned not to delay any longer than it was necessary to allow the main column to recross the bridge at Kinston; then to countermarch and act as rear guard. After going 6 miles my advance, commanded by Lieutenant Greig, Company H, came up with 12 mounted vedettes of the enemy. After a brisk chase of 3 miles they got away; not, however, before one of them was wounded by the lieutenant. About 800 yards distant from the spot where I concluded the farther chase to be fruitless I imagined I heard the noise of an engine; and, as I thought the feint would be more effective if cannon shots were fired, I ordered the howitzer in position and fire five rounds of spherical case-shot. After the third discharge the engine whistled and went toward Goldsborough. I sent some men forward, under Captain Willson, of Company H, to reconnoiter. They took 2 prisoners, South Carolinians, who refused to give any information further than that the train came down from Goldsborough that morning with troops, and had retired upon finding us advancing.

I returned to Kinston without further casualties and joined the main column.

All of which is respectfully submitted.

CHAS. FITZ SIMMONS,

Major, Third New York Cavalry.

Lieutenant Colonel JOHN MIX,

Commanding Third New York Cavalry.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report that on December 17, instant, I was detached from the main column of General Foster's army, then en route to Goldsborough Bridge, with Company B, Captain Moschell, and Company C, Lieutenant Mayes, for the purpose of destroying the railroad at Dudley Station, a point 5 miles distant from Goldsborough Bridge, on the Goldsborough and Wilmington Railroad. Upon entering the town the enemy's pickets, some 20 in number, scattered right and left in the direction of Mount Olive and Goldsborough. I in pursuance of orders proceeded to tear up the track, destroying the rails by piling up and interspersing them with dry lumber found at the station. I also burned two trestle-work culverts, a train of four railroad cars, water-station, depot, and storehouse. In the storehouse were some 50 muskets and 10 sabers, of no great value, and having no means of transportation I threw them into the flames. With the arms was a rebel flag, "the Stars and Bars," which I took away with me.

Having remained at Dudley two hours, to be sure that no attempt which might be made to save the railroad would be successful, I returned by a short cut to the main column, which I found engaged with the enemy at Goldsborough Bridge.

All of which is respectfully submitted.

CHAS. FITZ SIMMONS,

Major, Third New York Cavalry.

Lieutenant Colonel JOHN MIX,

Commanding Third New York Cavalry.